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a continuum from the previous posting:

Christian “Eucharist”  Founded in Ancient Semen-drinking Rites

While there is no evidence that the historical Jesus, himself, ever advocated the use of semen in either the Last Supper or otherwise in religious ritual, yet there is intriguing evidence that some of the most ancient Christian sects, known as “Gnostic Christians,” that predated Catholicism by many centuries, found deeper symbolic and spiritual meaning in using semen as the sacramental wine of the Communion. This more erotic interpretation is founded upon even more ancient rituals in which semen drinking was considered the drinking of Life, itself. Thus, its amalgamation into the symbolic drinking of Jesus’ blood so as to attain Eternal Life could not help but ring very familiar to such pagan converts. It should therefore come as no surprise to discover that in combining both rituals together, the semen-drinking adherents connected both with their pagan ancestral beliefs in semen as Life and also their newly found Christian beliefs in Jesus’ “body” and “blood” as Eternal Life.

Of course, following the Nicene Creed of 325 C.E. that universally mandated Christian doctrine and led to the establishment of the Catholic movement, such beliefs were condemned as “heretic.” This did not at first stop Gnostic Christians from their beloved beliefs and more erotic interpretations of Christianity:

“… However, to the dismay of the orthodox Church, some Mystery sects were still practicing an uncensored version of the anointing ceremony that used actual semen… In the Roman Church’s version of the mystic solar rites, the ‘good chrism’ is swallowed in order to infuse its allegedly life-giving potential. This act of performing ‘sacred fellatio’ for the male saviour – swallowing the royal seed, so to speak – leads us to the notion of the receiver of the ‘good chrism’ as emulating the goddess – in particular, Isis – servicing the male god.”

“In very ancient times, sexuality and divinity were seen as inseparable aspects of the ever-begetting Universe; sexual rites were an attempt to harness the generative powers of creation, as well as a celebration of the mysteries of life and rebirth. That the Church saw fit to preserve the essential elements of the sexual mythos, while prudishly hiding their meaning, indicates that the Church recognized the mystic potency of the ancient rites.”

Sexual Mysticism in Christianity, Michael Clair, 2009

See Also: The Truth about Woman, by C. Gasquoine Hartley
(i.e. Mrs. Walter M. Gallichan), NY, Dodd, Mead & Co. 1914

Author’s Note:  In the following excerpt from the 1906 publication, Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica, “The Eucharist,” (citing an earlier work, dated 1873, and the far-earlier testimony of St. Epiphane [4th century] ), semen is shown as having been ritually consumed in ‘Agape Feasts’ [Love Feasts] (the original ceremonies of the earliest Christian sects wherein “…many of the rituals involved the anointing and swallowing of this sacred substance [semen], an orgiastic ritual that had been the bane of the Old Testament prophets a thousand years before …”

… Saint Epiphane gives a complete description of the ceremony of the Eucharist, but attributes it exclusively to the Gnostics and takes care to represent it as an aberration abhorred by true Christians; in their assemblies, he said, men and women reciprocally ate the reproductive seed of humans, turning to the altar, and saying (to the All Mighty) “Offerimus tibi donum corpus Christi” “We offer in sacrifice the body of Christ!”

 John Romer, Testament: The Bible and History, p. 194

… in a process that Dr. O. J. Baab calls “Imitative Magic,” the believers would go to their temple and there engage in sexual intimacy with the temple prostitutes in the belief that the gods above would do the same and that the fields would then become fertile and productive.

O.J. Baab, “Prostitution”, The Interpreters Bible, Vol. 3, K-O

 

From Sir Roger Bacon, 1683:

“I have read many volumes of the wise,” he says, “and I find few things in physics, which restore the natural heat, weakened by dissolution of the innate moisture, or increase of a foreign one.” Nevertheless, he says, “certain wise men have tacitly made mention of some medicine. This medicine is like “Youth itself.” Later, Roger Bacon argues that “the infirmity of a man passeth into man; and so doth Health because of likeness” and then suggests that this medicine “will very much recreate an Old Man, and change him to a kind of Youth.” Further, he says, “There is such a heat in this thing, as is in Young men of a sound complexion.” Although at this point the nature of the medicine seems obvious, Bacon insists on keeping its name secret “lest the Incontinent should offend their Creator…” — more plainly which is here more obscurely described” the familiar story of the old king David (1 Kings, 1.2-4) in which close, but not sexual, contact with the body of a beautiful young virgin cures the king (temporarily) of age. Thus Bacon manages to obliquely offer the body of a young man as a kind of model apothecary shop and then, abruptly removing this body, replace it with the body of a young woman. The man-man-woman trio appears here in a kind of alchemical shell game… Drinking the blood of one’s fellow man could certainly be construed as “offending the creator.” Underneath this scandalous suggestion may lie the even more hidden and scandalous suggestion that the medicine is not human blood but semen, which was after all thought to be a more rarified essence of blood. Given the homoeroticism of the Sonnets, such a suggestion would seem logical. To my knowledge, however, it is not supported by direct evidence from medical or alchemical traditions.

Ian MacInnes,”Cheerful Girls and Willing Boys.” Early Modern Literary Studies 6.2 (September, 2000)

Authors Note:  To the contrary, Modern medicine has in fact discovered the value of semen as a food substance primarily for women:

An ounce of semen has been found to be basically equivalent to the concentration of the most valuable chemicals from 60 ounces of blood.  No two tissues in the body show greater similarity in their lecithin, colesterin and phosphorous contents than do brain tissues and semen.  Semen has proportionally more fructose, citric acid, semenine and prostaglandins than any other tissue in the body.  It is also richer than most any other tissue in zinc, ascorbic acid, inositol, glyceryl, phosphory-choline and free amino acids.  It has 33 times the neutral amino acids, 28 times the acidic amino acids and 57 times the basic amino acids as the blood.  Women may also absorb body chemicals from male semen other than prostaglandins to enrich their body chemistry and health.  (source misplaced)

 

Soma and the Holy Grail By Hugh Fitzroy Colmer

…  Now let us bring some focus on the lesser known facets of sexuality which range from the biological and historical to the symbolic and spiritual. Arjuna is the son of Indra. In the Rig Veda, a more in depth version of the Puranas, Indra is the greatest of the gods and he is a Soma addict.  Soma is the ‘Celestial Dew of Ecstasy’ a concoction of male and female love juices… This dew seems to be a type of endocrine nectar believed to drip down from the pineal gland or pituitary glands, or both into the body when the body is sexually aroused, and it was believed that when drunk it was the aid in achieving both immortality and enlightenment.

A goddesses’ menstrual blood was called the ‘The Astral Light’, being the ultimate source of manifestation, and in this regard it was directly equated with the mystical ‘Waters of Creation’ – the flow of eternal wisdom. Blood and sperm were the elixir of the gods. Male gods were invigorated when they drank a mixture of their sperm and menstrual blood and it was, they believed one of the keys to immortality. We can thank Judeo-Christianity for taking away the knowledge of one of our greatest gifts—the vital force of Soma, which consist of the fluids of life.

Priests, bishops, rishis, fakirs, yogis, and saints often had a kind of sexual “carte blanche” and were allowed, or even asked and sometimes paid, to make love to any woman they picked out of the crowd or visited at her home. It was once believed throughout India in general that the blood, or rather the semen of sacred persons, had generative powers. [this was especially true of the Brahman priests]

It is against this background that we must view the information that since ancient times the holy rishis have been asked by nobles and kings to have intercourse with the latter’s daughters and wives, and that fakirs, yogis, and holy persons of all kinds were regarded as being free to make love to any woman…

The Semetic scholar of Sumerian philology, John M. Allegro, of Dead Sea Scroll fame, might ire them further for his research revealed that Jesus/Joshua in its Greek form means ‘the semen that heals or fructifies,’ the god’s juice that gives life. When Christian devotees were smeared with this powerful liquid they absorbed it into their bodies and were brought into living communion with God and felt divine. The practice of drinking divine juices aided the devotee in his desired “direct access to God.” Men and women collected in their hands the mixed love juices of their union, sym­bolically offer them to their deity, and then proceed to drink and celebrate the Eucharist with their own sperm declaring it to be “The Body of Christ.”

The words “Holy Grail” are a mistranslation of early French words for “royal blood,” and the true purpose of Prieure de Sion is to protect alleged royal descendants of Jesus and prepare the way for their accession to world power. It was for this reason that the Knights Templars were burned as heretics for drinking from the Rosi-Crucis (the Cup of the Waters identified as a red cross within a circle…the Holy Grail — Martin Luther’s Seal, above right.) This Dew is connected with both male semen and the holy cross. Golden liquid is created during sexual union, which according to Taoist adepts is the inner alchemy instrumental in achieving longevity and even mortality. This liquid or subtle energy is created by the mingling and drawing into the body the secretions of both male and female practitioners. This leads to a mystical state of awareness and a merging of the individual with the all-pervading cosmic principle. Why wouldn’t the essence of life be sacred? And so the adage goes: There is nothing new under the sun; including sexual confusion and blasphemy against God.

______

Suck Like an Egyptian

The Crucifixion story was a ruse to guard the Sacred Mushroom. But the hoax became a trap we call Christianity. In 1970, the famed Dead Sea Scrolls scholar John Marco Allegro published a series of articles in the London Sunday Mirror, UK. This series announced that Christianity is based on a fertility-mushroom/drug cult, and that Jesus was none other than the mushroom itself.

… Horus then deliberately spreads his own semen on some lettuce, which was Set’s favourite food (the Egyptians thought that lettuce was phallic). After Set has eaten the lettuce, they go to the gods to try to settle the argument over the rule of Egypt. The gods first listen to Set’s claim of dominance over Horus, and call his semen forth, but it answers from the river, invalidating his claim. Then, the gods listen to Horus’ claim of having dominated Set, and call his semen forth, and it answers from inside Set [Here is a principle of Satanic Authority, Hierarchy and Tyranny]. In consequence, Horus is declared the ruler of Egypt. When the cult of Thoth arose in power, Thoth was retroactively inserted into the earlier myths, making Thoth the one whose magic caused Set and Horus’ semen to respond, in the tale of the contestings of Set and Horus, for example.

… The fertility god Dionysus (Greek Dionusos), whose cult emblem was the erect phallus, was also a god of healing, and his name, when broken down to its original parts, IA-U-NU-ShUSh…”semen, seed that saves’, and is comparable with the Greek Nosios or ‘Healer’, an epithet of Zeus… the sacramental use of semen, both eaten and rubbed on the body also had a long tradition in Canaanite religion.

John M. Allegro, The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross

… the “holy kiss”(Romans 16:16), or “kiss of Love”(1 Peter 5:14) which is suggested as a means of greeting. But, as the “kiss”, in the case of The Gospel of Philip is related to “conception” and “giving birth”, it could conceivably be a reference to the kissing of the genitals the Gnostic method of ritually collecting semen, and menses (i.e.-fellatio and cunnilingus), as both of these bodily-fluids were clearly Christian sacraments from the faiths earliest beginnings . “Fellatio was… used, according to Epiphanius… as a ritual technique among a number of Gnostic sects.

The Encyclopedia of Erotic Wisdom by Rufus Camphausen, 1991.

 

Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions

… in Gnosticism, where the elect could bestow “grace” on lesser initiates with a sacramental gift of their semen, in Tantrism semen is imbued with magical powers and a “drink containing the semen of a respected master is consumed by his disciples. semen represents the genetic heritage handed down from generation to generation” (Danielou, 1992)

… Robert Anton Wilson pointed to a number of medieval Alchemical manuscripts as making hidden references to the act of ingesting one’s seed, and noted that it is still practiced by modern occultists, who believe that semen “contains a real spiritual substance that is beneficial when consumed…. the semen contains this ‘life force’ and gives one the extra energy needed to reach the higher mystical trances” (Wilson 1973).

… the Naasenes viewed phallic-vaginal intercourse as “exceedingly wicked,” as by the potential of producing children, it prevented the return of the light trapped in matter back to the Kingdom of Light. The Naasenes paid reverence to gods, including Jesus, in the form of phallic images and practiced ritual masturbation in celebratory worship of the male power, ingesting the semenal emissions as the highest sort of sacrament.. “semen was referred to by the Naasenes as the ‘beauteous seeds of Benjamin,’ [here we have the esoteric Benjamite connection to the Holy Grail]  ‘the water in those fair nuptials which Jesus changing made into wine'”(Conner 1993)… “semen, or Bindu, is held to be the true elixir of life by Yoga and Tantric schools alike.”

J. Mumford, Sexual Occultism, Llewellyn, Saint Paul, 1975.

Dutch missionaries in New Guinea observed that among many tribes “the male’s semen was regarded as a sacred substance” and was used in healing and in fighting epidemics… In the oasis of Siwa, for instance, mothers regularly give their boys to older men for sexual use, both related and outside the family, and fathers regularly lend their young sons to each other, similar to the Central Asian Islamic tradition of bacaboz,[1] where most fathers trade their sons with others for sexual use. Pederastic marriages and pederastic prostitution have been so widespread in Siwa until just recently that everyone is accustomed to the proposition that men normally love boys more than they do women, saying: “They will kill each other for a boy, never for a woman.” Muslim holy men (imaam) regularly have boys available for sex, saying the ingestion of the imaam’s semen is necessary for absorbing his spiritual powers, sometimes even extending to formal marriage with the boy.

  • Ingeborg Baldauf, Bacabozlik: Boylove,
  • Folksong and Literature in Central Asia, Paedika 2(1990)12-31…
  • Gregersen, Sexual Practices, p, 203; Walter Cline,
  •  Notes on the People of Siwah and ElGarah in the Libyan Desert. Menasha, Wisc.: George Banta Publishing Co., 1936;
  • Edwardes and Masters, The Cradle of Erotica, pp, 245-6.

The Yellow Emperor of China (c. 2697-2598 B.C.) practiced the feedback of his own reproductive cells for therapeutic purposes (See: A. Ishihara & H. S. Levy, The Tao of Sex, Harper & Row, New York, 1970). In the “Sacred Marriage” material, the female participant is always called Inanna (Sefati 1998:305), so her human identity is obscured.  That is not surprising, for I suspect that, during the ritual, the only female present was Inanna. What I am suggesting is that the Nin.Dindir/entu was a medium. Through talent and training, she went into a trance and allowed Inanna to take over her body. Then the goddess could actually be present during the ritual. To a greater or lesser degree, the king could similarly have embodied the god Dumuzi.

A Medium is “… a social functionary whose body only, the person’s awareness suppressed while in an ecstatic state, serves as a means for spirits to assist and/or communicate with members of the medium’s group in a positive manner” (Paper 1995:87). The “witch of Endor” in the Hebrew Bible (I Samuel 28:7-25) was likely a medium, and other ancient examples include the oracular priestesses through whom Apollo spoke at Delphi and the Maenad devotees of Dionysus (Kraemer 1989:49). Today mediums function in many religions: for instance, Chinese, Korean, African, and African-Christian of the Americas (Paper 1997:95, 104-107, 222-226,303; Sered 1994: 181-193). Interestingly, the majority of contemporary mediums are female (Paper 1997:95).

Ancient Mesopotamia, like most other cultures, had its prophets and seers (Westenholz 2004:295). A number of them probably worked through trance. Indeed, “… ecstatic religious functionaries, that is, those whose religious functioning involves trance, are virtually ubiquitous in human cultures.” So it would not surprise me to discover that the Inanna of the “Sacred Marriage” rite was actually properly named, for the goddess was using the body of a willing and devout ecstatic and priestess, who was certainly not a “cult prostitute.” On the contrary, she would have had extremely high status and have been deeply revered, for she was chosen of the goddess. Finally, then, the identity of the human female participant in the ritual is irrelevant. She was Inanna!

“Tragically,” says one contemporary scholar, “scholarship suffered from scholars being unable to imagine any cultic role for women in antiquity that did not involve sexual intercourse” (Gruber 1986:138). However, recent scholars are fast setting the record straight. Even if ancient priestesses were involved in ritual sex, even if they received offerings for their temples, they were not prostitutes but devotees worshipping their deity.

“Sacred Prostitutes,” Jophanna Stuckey,  Matrifocus: Cross-Quarterly for the Goddess Women, 2005, vol. 5-1
Ms. Stuckey’s extensive Bibliography on Ancient Sexual Rites see endnote [i]

Spermo-Gnosis  A Lecture by Peter R. Koenig – Occult Researcher in Theosophy, Anthroposophy, Hermeticism & Freemasonry

The magician and the Gnostic live in two worlds at the same time. But, while the magician tries to use the world beyond, in order to have power over this world here, the Gnostic seeks a divine reality, a realm within this world here, which is only a sort of shadow world. Both the magician and the Gnostic (as have many other traditions such as Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist and Tantra) feel that sexuality might be the key or the door to other realities; but they differ in method between ascetic and libertinistic/sensual orientations: both still use the sexual force. Gnosticism is a varried set of overlaping traditions that often contradict each other. Not all gnostics were “spermo-gnostics”.  But of these I will speak now. I will summarize the complex Gnostic traditions (although the subject is far too diverse for anyone to depict it accurately in a short essay) but not their literature, nor compare their cosmology in general, nor their History; I will also go to modern times, where modern Gnostics probably find both worlds more real than the ancient Gnostics did.

This Pleroma, be it in man or somewhere in outer space, is the Gnostic counterpart to the “rotten” earthly place. Two routes can be pursued to leave this rotten place: to suppress or avoid it (the ascetic concept or Orphic); or to dissolve it while completely living it out (the sensual way of the Frankists and Dionysians). On a higher plane it is vice versa. The sensual way leads to homeopathic asceticism: weakening the evil whilst indulging in it like a necessity. The sensual gnostic embraces sin in order to experience the decaying of the world, and to rise as the Phoenix from the ashes. Sexual orgies are sweating out the divine Pneuma/Logos which rises to the Pleroma. The ascetic way reacts allopathically: against the poison of existence it gives ignorance of the body as a remedy.

The central point with the ascetic and sensual Gnostics lies with their concept of Sperm. It is the sperm that contains the Holy Logos which, when in Man, has to be brought back to the Pleroma. This implies two questions: 1) can women be saved? and,  2) what shall we do with the sperm? … it is the duty of the Man to give the universe back its completeness/integrity. On the material plane the woman is punished with the large wound between her legs.  This wound signifies the place where primitive man once was bound with his own female aspect: the perfect Androgyn, now torn apart. It is the man’s turn now to experience the lust which broke the universe apart. Woman has to suffer. Only man’s sperm transports the Holy Logos. Women lack the prostata and therefore are superfluous for man’s salvation as long as he does not achieve androgynity.  If he does have “use” for the female, then it is only as a channel to higher divine entities. [this is pure Tantrism as practiced by the Lhamas of Tibet, who go so far as to sacrifice the woman and even eat her] Maybe he sees some use for her menstrual blood? When he is Christian orientated (let us call him the libertine Gnostic), he might use her blood as the “Blood of Christ” and consume it as a “religious nourishment”. If he sees the world as a really bad place, he avoids having children and animalistic flesh-eating (and here we find vegetarians). An ascetic avoids having ejaculations, even with his wife, but directs his sexual energies in Yoga-practises into his head (where he assumes is found the most direct bridge to the Divine). In order to achieve Androgynity, he penetrates his wife (avoiding orgasm) so that she, as well, might benefit from his luck.

Yoga is one of the preliminary conditions to master the body before using it as a temple. By westerners, Yoga is mistakenly thought to be a system of physical exercises to keep the body supple and the mind calm. But the meaning of the word yoga is union and the system was developed by eastern adepts to assist them to attain union with the source of all being.  All the Gnostic movements, be they the old ones or modern ones, assign salvation only to man: the woman has to become a man in order to enter heaven. The ascetic Gnostics avoid ejaculation and let the woman join in his wonderful ability to “produce” the Logos; the libertine Gnostics use all of the woman’s gifts in order to sweat out the Pneuma. Gnosticism (in its varried forms) is only one tradition that comes into play in Ordo Templi Orientis symbology, and not all aspects of every kind of gnosticism are particularly important. These modern Gnostics (and their sheep) were sperm-eaters. They assigned this to the Holy Logos; and, at least Reuss and Crowley, did not like women.  However, while Reuss’ biography opened his mind dualistically towards both ascetic and libertinistic ways as a means of achieving salvation, Crowley’s libertinistic biography shows an individual whose universe got smaller each day, and whose world was populated with demons and angels, which did not dissolve at the darkest moment in order to give rise to a phoenix.     (Bibliography see: [ii])


[1] SEE: “The Universality of Incest” by Lloyd DeMause; Journal of Psychohistory 19 (2) Winter 1991


[i]       Bibliography: Ancient Sexual Rituals

  • Assante, Julia 1998. “The kar.kid/[kh]arimtu, Prostitute or Single Woman? A Reconsideration of the Evidence,” Ugarit-Forschungen 30:5-96
  • Assante, Julia 2003. “From Whores to Hierodules: The Historiographic Invention of Mesopotamian Female Sex Professionals,” 13-47 in Ancient Art and Its Historiography, edited A.A. Donahue and Mark D. Fullerton. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University
  • Astour, Michael C. 1981. “Ugarit and the Great Powers” 3-29 in Ugarit in Retrospect: Fifty Years of Ugarit and Ugaritic, edited Gordon D. Young. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns
  • Bird, Phyllis 1989. “`To Play the Harlot’: An Inquiry into an Old Testament Metaphor,” 75-94 in Gender and Difference in Ancient Israel, edited Peggy L. Day. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress
  • Brooks, Beatrice A. 1941. “Fertility Cult Functionaries in the Old Testament,” Journal of Biblical Literature 60:227-253
  • Brown, F., S.R. Driver, and C.A. Briggs, editors 1978 (1953). A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament…. Oxford: Clarendon
  • Cooper, J. S. forthcoming. “Prostitution,” Reallexikon der Assyriologie. 1932–. Founding eds. Erich Ebeling and Bruno Meissner. Berlin/Leipzig: de Gruyter
  • del Olmo Lete, Gregorio 1999. Canaanite Religion According to the Liturgical Texts of Ugarit. Bethesda, MD: CDL
  • de Tarragon, Jean-Michel 1980. Le Culte a Ugarit d’apres les textes de la pratique en cuneiformes alphabetiques. Paris: Gabalda
  • Frayne, Douglas 1985. “Notes on the Sacred Marriage Rite,” Bibliotheca Orientalis 42:5-22
  • Frazer, James G. 1981 (1890). The Golden Bough… Two Volumes in One. New York: Gramercy
  • Frymer-Kensky, Tikva 1992. In the Wake of the Goddesses: Women, Culture, and the Biblical Transformation of Pagan Myth. New York: Free
  • Gruber, Mayer I. 1986. “Hebrew Qedeshah and her Canaanite and Akkadian Cognates,” Ugarit-Forschungen 18:133-148
  • Harris, Rivkah 1960. “The Naditu Woman,” 106-135 in Studies Presented to A. Leo Oppenheim, edited E. Reiner. Chicago: University of Chicago
  • Harris, Rivkah 1961. “The Naditu Laws of the Code of Hammurapi in Praxis,” Orientalia n.s. 30:164-169
  • Harris, Rivkah 1975. Ancient Sippar: A Demographic Study of an Old-Babylonian City (1894-1595 B.C.). Istanbul: Historisch-Archeologisch Institut
  • Henshaw, Richard A. 1994. Female & Male, the Cultic Personnel: The Bible and the Rest of the Ancient Near East. Allison Park, PA: Pickwick
  • Herodotus 1983. The Histories, translated A. de Selincourt, revised A.R. Burn. New York: Penguin
  • Hooks, Stephen M. 1985. Sacred Prostitution in Israel and the Ancient Near East. Cincinnati, OH: Hebrew Union College Ph.D. dissertation, unpublished
  • Jewish Publication Society 1988. Tanakh, The Holy Scriptures: The New JPS Translation According to the Traditional Hebrew Text. New York: Jewish Publication Society
  • Kraemer, Ross S. 1989. “Ecstasy and Possession: Women of Ancient Greece and the Cult of Dionysus” 45-55 in Unspoken Worlds: Women’s Religious Lives, edited Nancy A. Falk and Rita Gross. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth
  • Kramer, Samuel N. 1969. The Sacred Marriage: Aspects of Faith, Myth and Ritual in Ancient Sumer. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University.
  • Lambert, Wilfried G. 1992. “Prostitution,” 127-157 in Aussenseiter und Randgruppen: Beitrage zu einer Sozialgeschichte des Alten Orients, edited V. Haas. Konstanz: Universitatsverlag
  • Lucian 1976. The Syrian Goddess (De Dea Syria), edited and translated H.W. Attridge and R.A. Oden. Missoula, MT: Scholars
  • Oden, Robert A., Jr. 2000 (1987). The Bible Without Theology. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois
  • Olyan, Saul M. 1988. Asherah and the Cult of Yahweh in Israel. Atlanta, GA: Scholars
  • Paper, Jordan 1995. The Spirits Are Drunk: Comparative Approaches to Chinese Religion. Albany, NY: State University of New York
  • Paper, Jordan 1997. Through the Earth Darkly: Female Spirituality in Comparative Perspective. New York: Continuum
  • Paper, Jordan forthcoming. “The Role of Possession Trance in Chinese Culture and Religion: An Overview from the Neolithic to the Present” in The People and the Dao: New Studies in Chinese Religion in Honor of Daniel L. Overmeyer, edited Philip Clart and Paul Crow. Monumenta Serica Monograph
  • Pritchard, James B. The Ancient Near East in Pictures Relating to the Old Testament. Second Edition with Supplement. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, 1969
  • Safati, Yitschak 1998. Love Songs in Sumerian Literature: Critical Edition of the Dumuzi-Inanna Songs. Ramat Gan, Israel: Bar-Ilan University
  • Sered, Susan S. 1994. Priestess, Mother, Sacred Sister: Religions Dominated by Women. New York/Oxford: Oxford University
  • Shepsut, Asia. Journey of the Priestess: The Priestess Traditions of the Ancient World. A Journey of Spiritual Awakening and Empowerment. London: Aquarian/Harper Collins, 1993
  • Stuckey, Johanna H. 2005. “Ancient Mother Goddesses and Fertility Cults,” Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering 7/1: 32-44
  • Teubal, Savina J. Sarah the Priestess: The First Matriarch of Genesis. Athens, OH: Swallow/Ohio University, 1984
  • Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language 1996. Avenel, NJ: Gramercy Random House
  • Westenholz, Joan G. 2000. “King by Love of Inanna – an Image of Female Empowerment?” NIN 1:75-89
  • Westenholz, Joan G. 2004. “[Religious Personnel:] Mesopotamia” 292-295 in Religions of the Ancient world: A Guide, edited Sarah I. Johnston. Cambridge. MA: Harvard University Belknap
  • Yamauchi, Edwin M. 1973. “Cultic Prostitution: A Case Study in Cultural Diffusion,” 213-222 in Orient and Occident: Essays Presented to Cyrus H. Gordon, edited H. Hoffner. Neukirchen-Vluyn, Germany: Kevelaer

[ii]          Spermo-Gnosis: OTO Bibliogragraphy and Further Reading

  • A choice of some Gnostic sources: “Leohnard Fendt: “Gnostische Mysterien”, ARW, Muenchen 1922/1980; Peter Sloterdijk: “Weltrevolution der Seele”, I, Artemis, Muenchen 1991; J.P. Asmusen/A. Boehlig: “Die Gnosis”, III, Artemis, Zuerich/Muenchen 1980; Robert Haardt: “Die Gnosis”, Salzburg 1967; E. Haenchen/M. Kraus: “Die Gnosis”, Artemis, Zuerich/Muenchen 1969; Wilhelm Bousset: “Hauptprobleme der Gnosis”, Vandenhoeck + Ruprecht, Goettingen 1907; Kurt Rudolph: “Die Gnosis”, Vandenhoeck + Ruprecht, Goettingen 1980; Hans Jonas: “Gnosis und Spaetantiker Geist”, Vandenhoeck + Ruprecht, Stuttgart 1934; Johann Maier: “Vom Kultus zur Gnosis”, Otto Mueller Verlag, Salzburg 1964; Elaine Pagels: “The Gnostic Gospels”, Random House, New York 1979; Wolfang Schultz: “Dokumente der Gnosis”, Matthes + Seitz, Muenchen 1986; Hans Leisegang: “Die Gnosis”, Kroener, Stuttgart 1985; and many more
  • Also R.L. Hubbard called his Scientology “gnosticism”, in: “False        Purpose Rundown”, 5th June 1984
  • Peter Sloterdijk: “Weltrevolution der Seele” , Artemis, Muenchen 1991, 19
  • Sources on Homeopathy: Georgos Vithoulkas: “Die wissenschaftliche Homoeopathie,” Goettingen 1986; Marco Righetti: “Forschung in der Homoeopathie,” Burgdorf-Verlag, Burgdorf 1988; J.T. Kent: “Zur Theorie der Homoeopathie, J.T. Kents Vorlesungen ueber Hahnemanns Organon”, Leer 1954
  • For example in: Robert Haardt: “Die Gnosis”, Salzburg 1967, 66
  • Ernst T. Kurtzahn (member of Theodor Reuss’ OTO), in: “Die    Gnostiker”, Baumann-Verlag, Schmiedeberg 1925, 77-82
  • Arnoldo Krumm-Heller (member of Reuss’ OTO): “Plantas Sagradas”,   Buenos Aires 1931, 72
  • Arnoldo Krumm-Heller: “Iglesia Gnostica”, Berlin 1931, 71
  •  Samael Aun Weor (member of Krumm-Heller’s group): “Buddha’s    Necklace” without date and place, 1-95
  • Gospel according to Thomas: “unless a man became a women, and a woman, man, thou canst not enter the Kingdom of Heaven”. Thus, not all Gnostics are Misogynists, though the era when Gnosticism was founded was totally Misogynist
  • Ernst T. Kurtzahn (member of Theodor Reuss’ OTO), in: “Die Gnostiker”, Baumann-Verlag, Schmiedeberg 1925, 77-82
  • Example in: Kurt Rudolph: “Die Gnosis”, Leipzig 1980 (2)
  • All pseudo-masonical rituals of Reuss’ and Crowley’s OTO are published in: P.R. Koenig: “How to make your own McOTO”, ARW, Muenchen 1996;
Crowley’s rituals also in: Francis King: “The Secret Rituals of the O.T.O.”, London 1973
  • Crowley: “A man who is strong enough to use women as slaves and plaything is all right”, “Woman is a creature of habit, that is, of solified impulses. She has no individuality”, “Monogamy is only a mistake because it leaves the excess women unsatisfied”, “A woman is only tolerable in one’s life if she is trained to help the man in his work without the slightest reference to any other interests soever”: “Confessions”, edited by John Symonds/Kenneth Grant
  • A try is: Ellic Howe/Helmut Moeller: “Merlin Peregrinus”, Koenigshausen + Neumann, Wuerzburg 1986; details also in P.R.Koenig: “Der Kleine Theodor Reuss Reader”, ARW, Muenchen 1993; P.R.Koenig: “Das OTO-Phaenomen”, ARW, Muenchen 1994; P.R. Koenig: “Der Grosse Theodor Reuss Reader”, ARW, Muenchen 1997