Editor’s/Author’s Note: Many readers, those educated during the height of the 20th Century’s mis-education system causing reductionist focus with authoritarian overtones–as per the Protocols of London’s Elders–have been taught that the Judeo-Christian Cosmology is not only mythical but even purposely fabricated.  Irascible interpolators have been at work, of that there is no doubt; so much so that nearly sixty to seventy per cent of the New Testament is little more than either plagiarism, doctrinal modifications for political gain, or additional outright lies.  Nevertheless, without accepting the core thesis as presented by essential Monotheism and its apogee, Islam, there is no comprehensible explanation for the endemic wickedness and global disorder now taking place in the world.  I assure you that Judgment Day, Heaven, Hell, and that our up and coming relocation to one or the other is reality and that Allah is the one God, even of the Lakota who call Him Wakan tankah (Great Spirit); and that Ibraham, Isa (Jesus) and Mohammad were/are His messengers, with Mohammad being the Seal (last) of some 120,000 odd prophets sent to recalcitrant sinners over the ages as warners, in contra-distinction to our present cadre of elitist wardens.  How do I know?  After a twenty year love affair with Occult Science, I threw away my TV along with the Occidental White Man’s Burden and foot-ballitis some fifteen years ago.  This allowed me to think so well and so clearly on these matters that I became a stranger in my own land by the grace of Allah.  So please take heed.  Believe me, its not a myth, but Uncle Sam is.

ENDNOTES:
[i] The writings of Marconis are based on earlier conjectures by Rosicrucian scholar Baron de Westerode, who wrote in 1784 that the disciples of the Rose Croix came from the East into Europe in 1188, for the propagation of Christianity after the Islamic troubles in Palestine.  The founder of their Order in antiquity was a seraphic [marriage to “angels”] priest of Alexandria, a Magus of Egypt named Ormesius, or Ormus.  He founded the Society of Ormus, which was joined by groups like the Essenes of Palestine and the Theraputae of the Thebaid Tradition (See Nesta Webster’s, “Secret Societies and Subversive Movements“, London, 1924, p. 87 and note 37, and also Jonathan Sellers, “Qadosh: The Johannite Tradition“) The poet John Milton (1608-1674) was Cromwell’s Foreign Secretary, who greatly influenced the latter’s international policies, but also had many ties with Rosicrucian mystics. In this light, Milton’s aforementioned inclusion of the “Kingdom of Ormus” into his Paradise Lost, especially when used to describe Satan, is likely to have been some type of an elaborate message he was sending, perhaps to the entire world. Westerode claimed that Ormus founded a society called “The Sages of Light”, to the members of which he gave a red cross as a decoration. This notion was later expanded by esoteric historian John Weisse in “The Obelisk and Freemasonry” (1881) and is basically taken for granted today by most writers on the subject. Michael Howard writes in “The Occult Conspiracy” (1989) that Ormus used the symbol of a cross, surmounted by a rose [Martin Luther’s Icon & Seal], “to symbolize the specifically pagan brand of Christianity he embraced.” The symbol of a red (or ‘rosy’) cross was later adopted by the Templars, while the cross with the surmounting rose was taken up by the medieval Rosicrucians.
[ii] Antiquities of the Illuminati, “The Johannite Legend of the   TemplarsBaron de Westerode.
[iii] Baalshem, or Balshem (Hebrew: “master of the name”), plural Baʿale Shem, Baaleshem, or Baleshem, in Judaism, title bestowed upon men who reputedly worked wonders and effected cures through secret knowledge of the ineffable names of God. Benjamin ben Zerah (11th century) was one of several Jewish poets to employ the mystical names of God in his works, thereby demonstrating a belief in the efficacy of the holy name long before certain rabbis and Kabbalists (followers of esoteric Jewish mysticism) were popularly called baʿale shem. During the 17th and 18th centuries there appears to have been a proliferation of baʿale shem in eastern Europe. Traveling the countryside, these men were said to have performed cures by means of herbs, folk remedies, and the tetragrammaton (four Hebrew letters signifying the ineffable name of God). They also inscribed amulets with the names of God to assist in their cures and were reported to have been especially efficacious in exorcising demons. Because the baʿale shem of this period, especially in Poland and Germany, combined faith healing with practical Kabbala (use of sacred formulas and amulets), they frequently clashed with physicians, against whom they competed. They were, moreover, constantly ridiculed both by rabbinic authorities and by followers of the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskala).
Preeminent among the baʿale shem was Israel ben Eliezer, commonly called Baʿal Shem Ṭov (or simply the Beshṭ), founder of the social and religious movement known as Ḥasidism. He was not, like many others, merely a magician or exorcist but an effective religious leader whose message won a large and lasting following.
Encyclopedia Britannica 2010
[iv] The Merovingian Infiltration of the Christian World Through Monasticism by Barbara Aho, 2008
[v] THE SONS OF THE SERPENT TRIBE Legacy of The Nephilim by Jonathan Sellers, Copyright © 1997-2003 Jonathan Sellers